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"Downloadable Stock Images": 3533 files

 These images are downloadable at high resolution, made available for reuse under the OGL (Open Government License). Click the Download image icon icon, under thumbnail to download.
 
A Tornado GR4 with 41 Squadron Royal Air Force soars over the south coast of England.  41 Squadron was formed in 1916 and is based at RAF Coningsby in Lincolnshire.
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4800 x 2973 px 16.00 x 9.91 in 7.61 MB
 
Troops boarding a Royal Air Force Voyager aircraft on their way home from Camp Bastion in Afghanistan.   Service personnel returning home from Afghanistan during Christmas 2013 were the first to fly all the way from Camp Bastion to Brize Norton on board the RAF’s new Voyager aircraft.   Two Voyagers have begun flying to and from Helmand to support the operational airbridge that transports all personnel to and from theatre.
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3000 x 1759 px 10.00 x 5.86 in 1.12 MB
 
Officer Cadets march past the front of the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst (RMAS) Old College, followed by instructors and the College Adjutant on horseback.  The Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in Surrey is where all officers in the British Army are trained to take on the responsibilities of leading the soldiers under their command.  More than 80 percent of officer cadets are university graduates, but some arrive with A-levels or equivalents. Others are serving soldiers who have been selected for officer training, and some come from overseas, having been chosen by their own country’s army to train at the world famous Academy. People cannot undertake training at their own private expense.  The Commissioning Course for Regular Army officers is 48 weeks long, including recess periods. It runs three times a year, starting in January, May and September. The Army Reserve course is shorter, as is the training course Sandhurst offers military personnel with professional qualifications in areas such as law and medicine.  Training at Sandhurst covers military, practical and academic subjects, and while it is mentally and physically demanding, there’s also plenty of time set aside for sport and adventurous training.  It’s a proud day for officer cadets going into the Regular Army when they finally march up the steps of Old College to be commissioned as officers at the end of the prestigious Sovereign’s Parade.
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3508 x 2480 px 11.69 x 8.27 in 1.66 MB
 
Image of HMS Eagle, seen here in the late sixties.
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3733 x 2963 px 9.33 x 7.41 in 0.89 MB
 
A soldier of the 1st Battalion The Duke of Lancasters Regiment (1LANCS) is pictured carrying a General Purpose Machine Gun (GPMG) during Exercise Border Storm at the Otterburn Training Ranges in Northumberland.    The Regiment was training with soldiers of the 2nd Regiment of the French Foreign Legion for the very first time.
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3280 x 4928 px 10.93 x 16.43 in 4.72 MB
 
The bulbous bow of aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth is towed under the Forth Bridge, Scotland enroute to Rosyth dockyard where the vessel is being assembled.  HMS Queen Elizabeth is the largest aircraft carrier ever to be built for the Royal Navy, weighing a hefty 65,000 tonnes.  She measures 283m from bow to stern and is 70m wide: her flight deck alone is just under four acres in length. She will have a crew of 680, with room for a further 900 personnel from embarked squadrons or Royal Marine Commando units.  Merlin helicopters will operate in the Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Airborne Early Warning (AEW) roles, as well as providing force protection and conducting other roles, including evacuating medical emergencies and the all-important collection of mail.  The Navy is shortly due to take ownership of the Merlin Mark 3 aircraft from the RAF, which will also operate from QEC carriers. These will replace the Commando Helicopter Force’s venerable Sea King Mark 4.
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2000 x 1415 px 8.00 x 5.66 in 0.54 MB
 
The first section of aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth is pictured leaving BAe Systems Govan shipyard its way to Rosyth for assembly.   HMS Queen Elizabeth is the largest aircraft carrier ever to be built for the Royal Navy, weighing a hefty 65,000 tonnes.  She measures 283m from bow to stern and is 70m wide: her flight deck alone is just under four acres in length. She will have a crew of 680, with room for a further 900 personnel from embarked squadrons or Royal Marine Commando units.  Merlin helicopters will operate in the Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Airborne Early Warning (AEW) roles, as well as providing force protection and conducting other roles, including evacuating medical emergencies and the all-important collection of mail.  The Navy is shortly due to take ownership of the Merlin Mark 3 aircraft from the RAF, which will also operate from QEC carriers. These will replace the Commando Helicopter Force’s venerable Sea King Mark 4.
45157096.jpg
3000 x 2000 px 7.50 x 5.00 in 1.91 MB
 
The bulbous bow of aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth is towed under the Forth Bridge, Scotland enroute to Rosyth dockyard where the vessel is being assembled.  HMS Queen Elizabeth is the largest aircraft carrier ever to be built for the Royal Navy, weighing a hefty 65,000 tonnes.  She measures 283m from bow to stern and is 70m wide: her flight deck alone is just under four acres in length. She will have a crew of 680, with room for a further 900 personnel from embarked squadrons or Royal Marine Commando units.  Merlin helicopters will operate in the Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Airborne Early Warning (AEW) roles, as well as providing force protection and conducting other roles, including evacuating medical emergencies and the all-important collection of mail.  The Navy is shortly due to take ownership of the Merlin Mark 3 aircraft from the RAF, which will also operate from QEC carriers. These will replace the Commando Helicopter Force’s venerable Sea King Mark 4.
45157092.jpg
2000 x 1149 px 8.00 x 4.60 in 0.73 MB